Why Do People Get Married?

Why do people get married? There are different reasons why people want to tie the knot.

The first probable answer to the question “Why do people get married?” may be for companionship. Most people want to grow old with someone they love. They want to have someone to talk to, travel with and share life’s challenges with. When life gets tough, it becomes manageable if you have a caring spouse by our side. Whether you have a job or stay home, sharing a household with somebody at night and on weekends can give a sense of fulfillment in your personal and social life.

Who doesn’t want romance in their life? In reality, you can get involved with someone without getting married but it can be meaningless if you think about it. Both of you know that either can give up on the relationship in a blink of an eye, creating a sense of tentativeness and insecurity. Coming with a formal marriage are respect and commitment, which can enhance the romantic value of the relationship. It’s always a great feeling to wake up with someone who has vowed to share his/her life with you, and vice versa. Stolen kisses or a late-night rendezvous are extra sweeter.

Some who are asked what they believe is the answer to Why do people get married?” will tell you that they want to have their own family. Raising a family with someone you love is possibly the most intimate relationship you can have. Bringing up children and doing everything to provide them with a good life (food, shelter, education, etc.) are not easy. Kids need both a male and a female influence. When one or the other is lacking, it may interrupt normal developmental patterns and social adjustments. There may be a lot of single parents who successfully raise healthy and successful children, but it is easier and better to have two parents who work together to attain this goal.

Those who have a job that pays sufficiently can financially support themselves. However, what happens when the company goes out of business or you acquire a life-threatening illness that costs you your job? The point here is not about getting married for money; rather, it is comforting to know that in marriage, the couple shares assets and helps each other through rough times including financial difficulties.

After weighing these options, you may be able decide whether you want to marry or not. Also, you may hopefully find the answers to the question “Why do people get married?”

Posted at June 28th, 2011.

12 Responses to “Why Do People Get Married?”

  1. Smartest person alive you $$$$tard says:

    This article is just proper BS. Like, whoppingly bad, ridiciously poor, and totally sucks donkey balls.

    Why do people get married? – is your headline, yet that is the only thing you do not answer. Instead, you go on a rant talking about the weirdest bunch of s$$t ever written in the history of the interwebz.

    Do people marry because of “comfort”? So, you can’t be in a comfortable position with a significant other if you are not married to that person? Why the hell is that so?

    Your answer was, in reality, this: “People are more comfortable if a relationship is binding and on paper, so none of the involved can escape”. Because that is what you mean right? You really can’t see how ridicilous that is? If you are with someone, then you love them. IF you love them, then they don’t need you to commit on paper, and neither to you.

    That’s the equilavent of meeting a someone, and then hand-cuffing yourselves. Do you not trust each other? Is there no faith or belief? You call that a relationship?

    Let me respond to the question, although I do not believe anyone except you will get the message, because nobody actually revisits this site.

    People marry because it’s a religious tradition. That’s the first reason. We call ourselves Christians or Jews or Muslims, yet we only pick a few of the rules and laws from the books, laws we find acceptable and doable, even likeable, and throw away the others. Marriage is one we kept. Hating homos, no-sex before marriage, no divorces, and no pork-eating are among those we threw away. Simple as.

    The second reason, and most important, is, like abovementioned, that we do not love that other partner. We do not trust, neither to we have faith, in them, and therefore marriage is something that “locks” us together, so when our doubts about the relationship and the “love” in general turns out to be true, it is much more dificult to “run away”. Or is it? The number of divorces in the western world are reaching incredible numbers, so are abuse and violence in families, people going to therapy and counseling, incest, etc. etc.

    That’s why people marry, you $$$$tard.

  2. Marvin says:

    I love your answer. I shared it with a lot of my friends and they loved it also

  3. Glad says:

    I Love this.

  4. Meghan says:

    This is naive. People get married because of social pressure. Everyone is expected to get married today. Instead of being seen as a way to commit to someone for life and be there for them through everything, it is seen as the next step in a relationship. “Okay, we’ve moved in, we’ve said I love you and it’s been a few years now. Maybe the answer is to get married.”

    The problem is that no one understands what that really means, hence the 41% divorce rate of first marriages, 60% divorce rate for second marriages, and 73% for third marriages. The fact that there is even such a thing as a second or third marriage, and in some cases more, is an insult to the institution of marriage in general.

    At first, marriage wasn’t about companionship. It was about money. It was a business deal largely based on the fact that women had no other place to go after they were grown. But these days, it’s not seen as an economic trade, and women have independence from being passed from their father’s houses to their husbands’. So the whole point of marriage has become a “This is what we’ve always done” social convention that puts pressure on people to do something that may or may not be against human nature: mate for life.

    To say we get married for romance or companionship is naive. That’s called a relationship. That’s why people get boyfriends or go to night clubs and hit on other people. Why do people get married? Because that’s what is expected of them. Stop being stupid and romanticizing everything and look at the facts otherwise you can hardly consider yourself a credible source.

  5. Sammy says:

    “Kids need both a male and a female influence. When one or the other is lacking, it may interrupt normal developmental patterns and social adjustments.”

    I agree that it is best for a child to have TWO parents, but I disagree that the parents need to be of opposite genders in order for the child to develop normally. I feel like that language is disrespectful to individuals who have been raised by loving gay and lesbian couples. Love, whether it be the love of two spouses or the love between a parent and a child, transcends gender.

  6. Lydia says:

    You can do all of these things without marriage tho…still dont see the point!!

  7. JAMES says:

    Meghan is a genius!! Could not have said it better.

  8. J says:

    I agree with Lydia 100% – all of these reasons are nonsense. Every single one of them can just as easily be done without marriage, of which only makes breaking up a massive pain if things don’t work out.

    Marriage is a religious/spiritual bond. Marriage is letting God know you love this person, and wish for the Father to bless the marriage. This is the case with most religions – it is for their Godly blessing. It’s like getting baptized. There is literally no point to it outside of this.

    So why do people who are not religious do it? It’s a societal symbol. Nothing more. They have Peter Pan syndrome and expect a wand to be waved that will magically make their relationship different somehow, and people that know they are married will look at them differently and with more respect (which is sometimes true, but that’s also ridiculous societal molding).

    Way I see it, if you think your relationship will magically get better when you get married, and the things listed in this article did not already happen before marriage (minus the kids and so forth, I’m talking about the emotion behind it), then you were not secure enough in the relationship beforehand and chances are, it’ll end in tragic failure. Hence why like 80% of current day marriages don’t work, and hence the existence of “eloping” and other such nonsense.

  9. Veronica says:

    Meghan and Sammy are both absolutely correct, and ALL sociological and historical evidence validates these statements.

    What I just don’t understand and the reason for the search that led me to this page is this: Why do people want to grow old and die together? Why do you want to suffer endlessly while watching your partner do the same, knowing that eventually one of you will die while the other lives in even more agony for a brief period of time before they then cease to exist as well.

    Why don’t we create a Brave New World option where you can choose to die at 60, together, peacefully euthanized?

  10. Renee says:

    I’m not married, and I feel even less alone just from reading most of these posts. I’m in no rush to get married, if I ever do.

    Personally, I think the government is interested in perpetuating marriage for its economic value. They’re just subsidizing it, but the breaks are probably nothing compared to how much married people often spend. I’m talking about the biggies: Wedding reception, jewelry, honeymoon/family vacations, kids, etc., all of which are repeated over and over again. Marriage is marketed to us so hard, and yet, if any other product we’ve bought into had as high a failure rate as marriage, it would be taken off the market. But divorce keeps the economy cranking too.

    A friend recently invited me to a wedding. (“Free food!” he said.) I declined. I have come to loathe these events, not out of envy, but out of dread. To me, watching two people get married is like watching two people bungee jump–with a rope that is rated for 50-80% failure. The couple feels fantastic through this experience (like a drug that eventually wears off), and they may live to cherish the memory, but chances are they will fall. Divorce may not be deadly, but this IS your life we’re talking about. Right? I don’t take the decision lightly, and I’m tired of people wondering why I don’t risk it when everybody knows the odds are about as crappy as it gets! It is I who should be asking married people why they do what they do.

    If you haven’t yet, check out the book Singled Out. It is a fun-to-read, witty and logical dissection of social attitudes and institutional support for marriage. Everyone, single or married, should read it and understand how the benefits of getting married are stacked, and how it is related to what it means to be single in our society.

    As a society, we need to catch up with reality. Being single can be very empowering and fulfilling, if you allow it to be. There are costs either way, so you have to do what is best for you. Marriage is an institutional control structure, which you don’t need in order to love other people (or yourself, for that matter!), have meaningful and successful relationships, and a happy and interesting life. Mixing love with institutional subordination is very unsexy to me!

  11. K. Miller says:

    Where did you get your facts from? You stated that “Kids need both a male and a female influence. When one or the other is lacking, it may interrupt normal developmental patterns and social adjustments.” What research did you base off the ‘interruption of normal development patterns’ comment?

  12. Take and Give says:

    Is it possible to agree with many points throughout both arguments?

    Of course; it’s just that not many people are willing to accept it. I was raised thinking that marriage was always something I had to do eventually, and I wasn’t really presented with any other option. With that being said, I was one of a handful of people that got married because I believed it sounded like a wonderful idea. It is clear to me now marriage is not necessary but only promising to a certain extent. Half of the marriages nowadays end in divorce. Why? Because the reasons for marriage so long ago are no longer valid in society today, that often after compromise, a couple begins to question their faith for one another continuously. And yes, a divorce is devastating to all parties involved. Marriage in the U.S. has it’s financial benefits and it shouldn’t be like that. It also shouldn’t be limited to a certain criteria either. A legal partnership reform is due in this country. Ultimately, I believe we must be more educated on the matter if we are truly going to be so passionate about such subjects.

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